An enjoyable scenic route over Arenig Fawr

The Arenigs are a less walked group of Snowdonian peaks, yet Arenig Fawr with its central positioning, enjoys huge panoramic views across most of Snowdonia. Here’s a circular route that we walked early on a very frosty January morning. The GPS track reported 7.25 miles of distance with about 2000 ft of climb. Allow 4 hours or so – more in adverse conditions. The ascent follows paths that are generally obvious whilst the descent & return crosses un-pathed grassy slopes before following tracks & lanes back to the start.

Morning path to Llyn Arenig Fawr
Morning path to Llyn Arenig Fawr

We start at a small lay-by on the minor road south of Llyn Celyn (if no parking is available here, then park at the old quarry just west of Arenig village). Cross the lane and follow the track uphill away from the road in an initially south-westerly direction. This path twists and turns over the moorland of Moel y Garth with beautiful views down on your left towards Bala and Llyn Tegid.

Golden light pours into the valley and begins to lift the sleepy mists of night.
Golden light pours into the valley and begins to lift the sleepy mists of night.

The track gives access to the small dam of Llyn Arenig Fawr and we shall soon find ourselves descending slightly to this beautiful lakeside. Here you will find a small walker’s bothy that could provide some useful shelter on a less pleasant day. Cross the ladder style next to the bothy and head across just below the dam.

Arenig Bothy a useful place to know of.
Arenig Bothy a useful place to know of.

If your are lucky enough to have great weather (as we did) the morning reflections in Llyn Arenig Fawr are glorious and it is well worth while pausing to soak up some of the tranquillity.

Llyn Arenig Fawr in the winter golden hour. Reflections and warm glow on a frosty morning.
Llyn Arenig Fawr in the winter golden hour. Reflections and warm glow on a frosty morning.

Now we must climb up the hillside to the south of the lake, via Carreg Lefain and on to the point known as Y Castell. The climb is steeper here and follows a smaller path but the way is clear and there are no significant obstacles.

The pull up to Y Castell
The pull up to Y Castell

Having crossed an old dilapidated fence-line near Y Castell, we continue ahead, slightly less steeply for the moment. Shortly we will find ourselves walking parallel to another fence-line and with great views of Arenig Fawr ahead. Whilst there are various options here, we chose to cross the fence-line to our right and head uphill on to the shoulder of Arenig Fawr.

Arenig Summit in view
Arenig Summit in view

Now progress consistently uphill south westerly towards the summit. There’s a little patch of scree and boulders but the path makes for easy crossing along its upper edge. Eventually you will notice the summit trig point ahead of you.

Trig point on the summit of Arenig Fawr
Trig point on the summit of Arenig Fawr

The views from the summit are spectacular, though you will need a clear day to appreciate it at its best. Rhobell Fawr & Cadair Idris to the south (see header feature photo), Snowdon a little over 17 miles to the north plus Rhinogs, coastline and more to the west. As so often, there was a little haze on our morning but still very enjoyable views.

From the summit of Arenig Fawr: Moelwyn, Cnicht, Nantle Ridge.
From the summit of Arenig Fawr: Moelwyn, Cnicht, Nantle Ridge.

There are lots of possibilities for the descent from here, we chose to partially retrace our steps for a few metres to the NE. A westerly facing gully will be noticed just beneath you (headed by an old post when we were up there). Drop down through this gully and then bear to your right (NE again) to carefully descend on to the rough grassy western slope of Arenig Fawr.

Descending to the track by Amnodd-wen
Descending to the track by Amnodd-wen

From here we are crossing pathless open access land to descend towards the old abandoned farmhouse of Amnodd-wen. As you get lower down the slope, head for the gateway through the stone wall and then down onto the track just south of Amnodd-wen, turning right (northerly) when you reach it. It’s worth pausing at Amnodd-wen to look back at the mountain you’ve just crossed, as well as to perhaps consider what life was like living here in years gone by.

Looking back from Amnodd-wen
Looking back from Amnodd-wen

Now follow this track to the north. When you meet the old railway line do not stray on to it, just continue to follow the track back to the local lane. When you reach the lane, turn right on to it and follow it back through Arenig village to where you parked. A beautiful walk which you may well have all to yourself.

The lane back to the start of the walk.
The lane back to the start of the walk.

Maps & more photos below.

Altitude:

AreningFawr-altitudeprofile
AreningFawr-altitudeprofile

Route Map:

Gallery:

Ode of the Dawn Walker

Ode of the Dawn Walker

As golden flood pours in
Sleepy night gives way to mists of morn
In vale below the cock doth crow
And hound speaks forth
The darkness sundered and torn.

The tweet of birds stirring in heather
The prominences of walker fresh & cold
Caressed by sun born anew, like gentle glowing feather.
Still the frosted path leads ahead
A serpent slithering amongst the mountain folds.

Reflections deep and vivid speak
Eye to the soul of mountain borne
Up ridge, through col to lonesome peak
View and atmosphere a magic spawn
This traveller shall return, for another dawn.

The way ahead lies twisted and frozen.
The way ahead lies twisted and frozen.
  • Aperture: ƒ/6.3
  • Credit: AnnMarie Jones
  • Camera: COOLPIX B700
  • Caption: Morning path to Llyn Arenig Fawr
  • Focal length: 5.4mm
  • ISO: 100
  • Keywords: Landscape, Mountain, Seasons, Winter, scenic
  • Shutter speed: 1/1600s
  • Title: Walking into the Sunrise

(inspired by a lovely walk, whose route I’ll post next week)

Craig Cwm Silyn

Craig Cwm Silyn, a morning walk at the western end of the Nantlle ridge.

This walk starts at a small parking area that the landowner kindly allows visitors to use. Having walked most of the Nantlle ridge earlier this year (see this post), we wished to visit Craig Cwm Silyn at the western most point (the one peak that we didn’t visit before). Here’s the morning view from the permissive parking area:

The view from the permissive car parking for Craig Cwm Silyn.
The view from the permissive car parking for Craig Cwm Silyn.

We followed this track ahead into the sunrise. It passes through a gate, over a ladder style, and then starts to drop downhill towards the lakes at Cwm Silyn. Just before reaching the lakes, turn right, to climb over another ladder style (see photo below).

Early morning sunlight illuminates Tamsin on the ladder-style above the lakes of Cwm Silyn
Early morning sunlight illuminates Tamsin on the ladder-style above the lakes of Cwm Silyn

Now follow the grassy track ahead before turning uphill to your right (away from the lakes) to meet the path that ascends along the edge of the crags. It is from a point early along this section that I took the feature image (top) of the sunrise.

The path steadily climbs and as one nears the top it curves to the left, continuing along the top of the cliffs. The view back towards the coast can be excellent providing that the coastal cloud has lifted sufficiently.

A autumn morning view looking towards the coastline and Anglesey from Craig Cwm Silyn.
An autumn morning view looking towards the coastline and Anglesey from Craig Cwm Silyn.

Continue walking ahead, still gently rising to cross another ladder style before finally climbing to the highest point, a little over 2,400ft above the coast. The summit is fairly rocky and enjoys views towards Moel Hebog, as well as along the further peaks of the Nantlle ridge. On our walk, the morning clouds descended briefly before lifting again to show us this fine view across Mynydd Tal y mignedd (with its obelisk) & the Nantlle ridge in general:

Early sunlight illuminates the Nantlle ridge on an autumn morning.
Early sunlight illuminates the Nantlle ridge on an autumn morning.

There are various ways to extend this walk but as you will see from our way map below, we followed a similar route back down to the car. An enjoyable & rewarding walk to start the autumn with. The scenery and weather inspired me to produce an artwork in Digital Oils of the view towards a cloudy Moel Hebog. You can see the image on my pro site, Natures Universe.

Route Map:

Photo Gallery:

Nantlle Ridge circular walk

This walk, along a spectacular section of the Nantlle Ridge, provides great views across Snowdonia, as well as out to sea. It is one of the classic Snowdonian ridge walks. Our version is ~ 7 miles long with a 3000ft climb; both starting and finishing in the car park at Rhyd Ddu – next to the Welsh Highland Railway station. Having parked up (£5 for the day, at time of writing), leave the car park by crossing the A4085 and enter the field opposite via an an interesting metal gateway. The stoned path bridges the Afon Gwyrfai, keep right (ignoring our little excursion on the GPS track below) to reach a corner in the Nantlle road (B4418). Upon reaching the lane, immediately turn left on to a path to the base of Y Garn. Soon the path will split, take the path up Y Garn – we shall be returning along the lower path in a few hours. As you steadily climb Y Garn the views back to Rhyd Ddu with Snowdon beyond are well worth a short breather pause – there was plenty of early haze on our day.

Looking back through haze towards Snowdon and the morning sun.
Looking back through haze towards Snowdon and the morning sun.

Continue up Y Garn, the uphill walk is straightforward enough but could be quite a haul if you were not fit to hill walking and the spring lambs seemed quite curious of our ascent.

A Welsh Mountain Lamb watches the two humans climb Y Garn.
A Welsh Mountain Lamb watches the two humans climb Y Garn.

When almost at the summit the ground becomes quite rocky and the views open up all around. The summit itself is just to your right by the cairns. Once finished here, we should strike off again in a SSW direction, keeping the cliffs to your right. We are now heading for Mynydd Drws-y-coed.

A pause for photos after Y Garn and before Drws-y-coed.
A pause for photos after Y Garn and before Drws-y-coed.

We paused by the stonewall here, to admire the views with mountains peeping up above the morning clouds. The next section is the only part of this route to involve scrambling, just maintain good contact with the rock and take particular care of any exposed places above the cliffs to your right. I should also say that this would be significantly more challenging & risky in wintery conditions where considerable equipment & experience would be vital.

Looking up the topmost crags of Mynydd Drws-y-coed withTrum y Ddysgl beyond.
Looking up the topmost crags of Mynydd Drws-y-coed with Trum y Ddysgl beyond.

Having reached the summit of Drws-y-coed, we shall now keep the cliffs on our right as we descend and then climb again to the summit of Trum y Ddysgl. Take care not to miss the point at which the path splits, to take in the summit one needs to bear right & more steeply uphill again.

Looking back eastwards as we approach the summit of Trum y Ddysgl.
Looking back eastwards as we approach the summit of Trum y Ddysgl.

This is glorious walking and having reached the summit, we now swing to our left along the ridgetop. Towards the south-westerly end of this ridge we now have the option to turn westerly and cross to the obelisk marked peak of Mynydd Tal-y-mignedd.

Mynydd Tal-y-mignedd from Trum y Ddysgl
Mynydd Tal-y-mignedd from Trum y Ddysgl

Given my propensity for “just one more peak” we did of course go to view the obelisk.

Tamsin and the stone pillar obelisk at the summit of Tal-y-mignedd.
Tamsin and the stone pillar obelisk at the summit of Tal-y-mignedd.

This was a good spot to pause and have a snack to lift our energy levels. Spicy pork steak sandwiches & salad were greatly appreciated but there were rather too many midges who thought that we looked like a tasty breakfast :O

Next up was the return walk, retracing our steps back to the Trum ridge.

On the Nantlle Ridge: the view back to Trum y Ddysgl from Tal y mignedd
On the Nantlle Ridge: the view back to Trum y Ddysgl from Tal y mignedd

Having regained the ridge we now head down the south-east spur, descending towards Bwlch-y-ddwy-elor and Beddgelert forest, which should be to our left. As we descend, Cwm Dwyfor and the head of the mines of Cwm Pennant are down to our right.

The view back to part of the Nantlle Ridge as you descend to Beddgelert forest.
The view back to part of the Nantlle Ridge as you descend to Beddgelert forest.

Upon reaching the Bwlch, a gateway will be seen entering the forestry, take this track and follow it down through the picturesque forestry. When you meet the vehicular forest tracks, take close note of our GPS tracklog. In brief, turn right and then almost immediately left, follow this track with a stream on your left until you meet a ‘T’ junction. At the ‘T’ turn left over the stream and then right again to short cut on to another forestry vehicle track. You will notice a bridle-path leaving this track on your left (North). Take this bridle-path, follow it through the forestry & then across the open farmland, back to where you originally turned uphill to climb Y Garn. From here you should simply retrace your steps back to the car park at Rhyd Ddu.

Once you’ve completed the walk, you may be lucky enough to see a steam train in the station.

Ex South African Railways NGG16 Class Garratt Loco manufactured by Beyer-Peacock 1958, now operating on the Welsh Highland Railway.
Ex South African Railways NGG16 Class Garratt Loco manufactured by Beyer-Peacock 1958, now operating on the Welsh Highland Railway.

The steam train is a majestic and probably less energetic way to take in some of the natural beauty of Snowdonia, but perhaps that’s one for another day 🙂

Tracklog:

Photo Gallery:

Machynlleth and Llyn Glanmerin – a short walk

A short (~ 4miles with 750ft climb) circular route from Machynlleth to visit beautiful Llyn Glanmerin. This is a relatively easy walk for any regular walker, including children. It does have a climb near to the start, so some fitness is advised. Tamsin and I walked this at the beginning of June whilst our car was in the garage for maintenance. There’s plenty of views & wildlife to take in on this pleasant stroll.

For convenience I have started the walk from the main Pay & Display Car Park in Machynlleth (Loos available at CP entrance). Exit the back of the car park and turn left on to a pleasant tarmac walkway which will lead you past the library and on to the high street. Turn right & follow the pavement until you reach the road turning right for Forge & Dylife, take this turning. Close to the end of the housing you will see a signposted footpath leading to the right. Follow this footpath away from Machynlleth, uphill on the right edge of the local common land. As you climb above the golf course on to bracken & heath, do look back at the view of Machynlleth nestled amongst the hills of Dyfi.

Machynlleth Panoramic
Machynlleth Panoramic

Continue uphill across this now heathy common land. The track now strays from the righthand edge a little, crossing open land from one block of woodland edge to another. Keep an eye open for Red Kites gliding across the skies above you.

Red Kite against blue skies
Red Kite against blue skies

When you meet Glyndwr’s Way crossing you from wooded left to open heath right, keep straight ahead into a narrow wooded path that takes you on a brief detour to Llyn Glanmerin. As you emerge from the forestry Llyn Glanmerin is immediately down to your left. Llyn Glanmerin is sometimes referred to as Lord Herbert’s lake. Lord Herbert Vane Tempest of Plas Machynlleth was a director of the Cambrian Railways. He sadly died, along with 16 others, in the Abermule train crash of 1921. The lake itself is of about 7 acres in area and is most picturesque with water lilies floating upon it and Rhododendrons on its banks.

Banks of Llyn Glanmerin
Banks of Llyn Glanmerin
Water Lily on Llyn Glanmerin
Water Lily on Llyn Glanmerin

On a warm summer day Dragonflies & Damselflies are to be seen patrolling the water’s margins in search of a mate or laying eggs beneath the surface.

Skimmer Dragonfly
I believe this to be a female Black-tailed Skimmer (Orthetrum cancellatum) Dragonfly; with dark pterostigma yet golden costa.

Now briefly retrace your steps through the narrow section of woodland, back to Glyndwr’s way. Upon meeting the Glyndwr’s way path, turn west along it and over the open heath land. This well marked path will then lead you downhill towards the Cae-Gybi lane. As you descend, see if you can spot Plas Machynlleth (Lord Herbert’s old home) beneath you at the edge of Machynlleth.

Plas Machynlleth
Plas Machynlleth

Upon meeting the lane, turn right along it briefly, before again leaving it to follow Glyndwr’s way down to Plas Machynlleth. Turn right & walk along the path through Plas Machynlleth’s grounds. This will lead you to the back of the car park from whence you began the walk.

Route Map:

Gallery: