A pause for photos after Y Garn and before Drws-y-coed.

Nantlle Ridge circular walk

This walk, along a spectacular section of the Nantlle Ridge, provides great views across Snowdonia, as well as out to sea. It is one of the classic Snowdonian ridge walks. Our version is ~ 7 miles long with a 3000ft climb; both starting and finishing in the car park at Rhyd Ddu – next to the Welsh Highland Railway station. Having parked up (£5 for the day, at time of writing), leave the car park by crossing the A4085 and enter the field opposite via an an interesting metal gateway. The stoned path bridges the Afon Gwyrfai, keep right (ignoring our little excursion on the GPS track below) to reach a corner in the Nantlle road (B4418). Upon reaching the lane, immediately turn left on to a path to the base of Y Garn. Soon the path will split, take the path up Y Garn – we shall be returning along the lower path in a few hours. As you steadily climb Y Garn the views back to Rhyd Ddu with Snowdon beyond are well worth a short breather pause – there was plenty of early haze on our day.

Looking back through haze towards Snowdon and the morning sun.

Looking back through haze towards Snowdon and the morning sun.

Continue up Y Garn, the uphill walk is straightforward enough but could be quite a haul if you were not fit to hill walking and the spring lambs seemed quite curious of our ascent.

A Welsh Mountain Lamb watches the two humans climb Y Garn.

A Welsh Mountain Lamb watches the two humans climb Y Garn.

When almost at the summit the ground becomes quite rocky and the views open up all around. The summit itself is just to your right by the cairns. Once finished here, we should strike off again in a SSW direction, keeping the cliffs to your right. We are now heading for Mynydd Drws-y-coed.

A pause for photos after Y Garn and before Drws-y-coed.

A pause for photos after Y Garn and before Drws-y-coed.

We paused by the stonewall here, to admire the views with mountains peeping up above the morning clouds. The next section is the only part of this route to involve scrambling, just maintain good contact with the rock and take particular care of any exposed places above the cliffs to your right. I should also say that this would be significantly more challenging & risky in wintery conditions where considerable equipment & experience would be vital.

Looking up the topmost crags of Mynydd Drws-y-coed withTrum y Ddysgl beyond.

Looking up the topmost crags of Mynydd Drws-y-coed with Trum y Ddysgl beyond.

Having reached the summit of Drws-y-coed, we shall now keep the cliffs on our right as we descend and then climb again to the summit of Trum y Ddysgl. Take care not to miss the point at which the path splits, to take in the summit one needs to bear right & more steeply uphill again.

Looking back eastwards as we approach the summit of Trum y Ddysgl.

Looking back eastwards as we approach the summit of Trum y Ddysgl.

This is glorious walking and having reached the summit, we now swing to our left along the ridgetop. Towards the south-westerly end of this ridge we now have the option to turn westerly and cross to the obelisk marked peak of Mynydd Tal-y-mignedd.

Mynydd Tal-y-mignedd from Trum y Ddysgl

Mynydd Tal-y-mignedd from Trum y Ddysgl

Given my propensity for “just one more peak” we did of course go to view the obelisk.

Tamsin and the stone pillar obelisk at the summit of Tal-y-mignedd.

Tamsin and the stone pillar obelisk at the summit of Tal-y-mignedd.

This was a good spot to pause and have a snack to lift our energy levels. Spicy pork steak sandwiches & salad were greatly appreciated but there were rather too many midges who thought that we looked like a tasty breakfast :O

Next up was the return walk, retracing our steps back to the Trum ridge.

On the Nantlle Ridge: the view back to Trum y Ddysgl from Tal y mignedd

On the Nantlle Ridge: the view back to Trum y Ddysgl from Tal y mignedd

Having regained the ridge we now head down the south-east spur, descending towards Bwlch-y-ddwy-elor and Beddgelert forest, which should be to our left. As we descend, Cwm Dwyfor and the head of the mines of Cwm Pennant are down to our right.

The view back to part of the Nantlle Ridge as you descend to Beddgelert forest.

The view back to part of the Nantlle Ridge as you descend to Beddgelert forest.

Upon reaching the Bwlch, a gateway will be seen entering the forestry, take this track and follow it down through the picturesque forestry. When you meet the vehicular forest tracks, take close note of our GPS tracklog. In brief, turn right and then almost immediately left, follow this track with a stream on your left until you meet a ‘T’ junction. At the ‘T’ turn left over the stream and then right again to short cut on to another forestry vehicle track. You will notice a bridle-path leaving this track on your left (North). Take this bridle-path, follow it through the forestry & then across the open farmland, back to where you originally turned uphill to climb Y Garn. From here you should simply retrace your steps back to the car park at Rhyd Ddu.

Once you’ve completed the walk, you may be lucky enough to see a steam train in the station.

Ex South African Railways NGG16 Class Garratt Loco manufactured by Beyer-Peacock 1958, now operating on the Welsh Highland Railway.

Ex South African Railways NGG16 Class Garratt Loco manufactured by Beyer-Peacock 1958, now operating on the Welsh Highland Railway.

The steam train is a majestic and probably less energetic way to take in some of the natural beauty of Snowdonia, but perhaps that’s one for another day 🙂

Tracklog:

Photo Gallery:

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